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Miller v california porn

miller v california porn

Miller V. California. Anti Essays . Retrieved February 23, 2017, from the World Wide Web: http:///free-essays/Miller-V-California-

Justice Frankfurter held that the law violated the due process clause of the 14th Amendment because it "reduce[d] the adult population of Michigan to reading only what is fit for children."

Because obscenity is not protected speech, states generally are free to pass laws that make it illegal to produce, publish, sell, or otherwise circulate “obscene” works without running afoul of the First Amendment. In the seminal obscenity case, Miller v. California (1973) , the US Supreme Court famously laid out its current three-part test for determining whether a work is obscene. According to the Miller court, the First Amendment does not protect works that satisfy the following elements: