logo

Freedom of speech history porn

freedom of speech history porn

The right to speak without censorship or restraint by the government. Freedom of speech is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution . ( See clear and present danger .)

Not everyone agrees with the libertarian view of John Milton's Areopagitica or its embodiment in the First Amendment as defined by Oliver Wendell Holmes, especially given the increased threat of terrorism. Thus, democratic governments and societies continue to debate about the balance between national security and free expression as well as about other controversial issues such as obscenity, hate speech, political speech, intellectual property rights, and accountability of the media, among others.

In the turbulent 1960s, several important cases involving the freedom of expression were appealed and argued before the . Supreme Court.  In New York Times v. Sullivan (1964), an elected police commissioner sued the New York Times for an advertisement in their paper that was critical of police in Montgomery, Alabama.  The advertisement made a series of statements about police treatment of civil rights leaders, some of which were not factual.  Despite the fact that he was never mentioned by name, . Sullivan felt the article libeled him because to be critical of the police was to, in turn, be critical of the commissioner.  A case without precedent, Sullivan’s lawsuit against the New York Times traveled all the way to the Supreme Court.

Preserving American Freedom, a Historical Society of Pennsylvania digital history project funded by Bank of America, explores how Americans have interpreted and fought for their freedoms from the 1600s to the present and how these freedoms have shaped America's history.
Read more